Recovery From An Eating Binge

Hey Guys

First of i’m not here to give you a telling off if you binged, remember we are only human and it can happen. But instead i’m gonna tell you a bit about why you might have binged and what you can do about from both medical standpoint and from me personally!

So first off let’s cover they WHY!!!!!

Now It’s not clear what causes binge eating, but, like most eating disorders, it’s seen as a way of coping with feelings of unhappiness and low self-esteem. Personally i use to binge eat massively on the regular when i was morbidly obese since that was all i knew and it did at the time help deal with emotional issues (from bullying to loneliness) . nowadays it tends to be when i get sick. When i’m ill unlike a lot of people my appetite increase massively rather than decreases and i can easily go and eat 5000 cals in a day (which is not healthy). But like i said the important things is progress over perfection. Where as before i would overeat for at least 3-4 weeks, now i can reduced down to 3 days, aiming to bring it next down to one day, so always looking to improve!

So here are some factors that can trigger binge eating:

  • Factors that may increase your risk of binge eating include:
  • having low self-esteem and a lack of confidence
  • depression or anxiety
  • feelings of stress, anger, boredom or loneliness
  • dissatisfaction with your body and feeling under pressure to be thin
  • stressful or traumatic events in your past
  • having a family history of eating disorders
  • Binge eating can sometimes develop following a strict diet, particularly if you skipped meals, cut out certain foods and didn’t eat enough food. These are unhealthy ways to lose weight and may mean you’re more likely to binge at another time

So for me, i have had all of these factors affect me from a family history of eating disorders to dealing with depression.

So what are the signs of binge eating disorder? Below are the most common signs of binge eating from both medical literature and what i personally have experienced:

  • Eating much faster than normal during a binge
  • Eating until you feel uncomfortably full and beyond
  • Eating a large amount of food when you’re not hungry
  • Eating alone or secretly because you’re embarrassed about the amount of food you’re consuming
  • Having feelings of guilt, shame or disgust after binge eating
  • People who regularly eat this way are likely to have a binge eating disorder.

What happens during a binge:

  • Binges are often planned in advance and the person may buy “special” binge foods.
    Sometimes, a person will describe being in a “dazed state” during a binge – particularly
  • Binges at night – and not being able to remember what they ate.
    The person often feels they have no control over their eating.
  • After a binge a person can feel overwhelmed and have symptoms similar to panic attack

Getting help! Guys this is probably the main reason you’re here and is the most important, so let’s go over what the NHS has recommended:

Now remember guys If you occasionally binge eat, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have a binge eating disorder. Can can mean you just need to make sure your nutrition is good to help reduce incidence.  

But see your GP if you binge regularly, particularly if it’s affecting your physical and/or mental health. With the right treatment and support, most people get better.
Beat is a UK-based charity that provides help and support for people with eating disorders.

You can contact them either by phone or email:
helpline for adults – 0808 801 0677 (email: help@b-eat.co.uk)
helpline for young people (under 25) – 0808 801 0711 (email: fyp@b-eat.co.uk)
The helplines are open Monday to Wednesday, 1pm to 4pm and Thursday and Friday, 10am to 1pm.
You can also find out more about Beat’s support services.

Treating binge eating

So what are the The main treatments for binge eating:

  • self-help programmes – this may be individually, using a book or online course, or as part of a self-help support group or visiting our website 🙂
  • guided self-help (self-help supervised by regular contact with a professional)
    specialist group intervention
  • individual (one-to-one) psychological therapy
  • medication called selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs)

What causes binge eating?
Okay unlike a lot of disorder it’s still not clear what causes binge eating, but, like most eating disorders, it’s seen as a way of coping with feelings of unhappiness and low self-esteem.
Factors that may increase your risk of binge eating include:

  • having low self-esteem and a lack of confidence
  • depression or anxiety
  • feelings of stress, anger, boredom or loneliness
  • dissatisfaction with your body and feeling under pressure to be thin
  • stressful or traumatic events in your past
  • having a family history of eating disorders

One big factor can be result of following a strict diet, particularly if you skipped meals, cut out certain foods and didn’t eat enough food. These are unhealthy ways to lose weight and may mean you’re more likely to binge at another time. So more healthy way to get lean vist out transformation workout program.  

Who’s affected
NOW there is a common misconception that binge eating only affect women but anyone can be affected by binge eating disorder, although it’s slightly more common in women than men.
Binge eating disorder tends to first develop during early adulthood, but many people don’t seek help until they’re in their 30s or 40s.
It’s estimated that you have a 1 in 30 to 1 in 50 chance of developing binge eating disorder at some point in life.

Health risks of binge eating
Binge eating is often associated with serious psychological problems, including depression and anxiety which may get worse if you continue to binge eat.
Weight gain is a common physical effect of binge eating, which can lead to obesity. Being obese puts you at risk of getting a number of serious physical health problems, including:

  • High cholesterol and high blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Some types of cancer – such as breast cancer and bowel cancer

[Reference from NHS]

So what do you guys think? What your experience with binge eating and how did u beat it? Leave your interesting comments below and let’s have a discussion.

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